Atronic Alarms Blog

National Preparedness Month September

National Preparedness Month

The recent hurricanes pounding the coasts this month are reminders that Mother Nature reigns over humans every time. As we wrap up September, which is National Preparedness Month, remember that it’s never too late to complete a disaster preparedness plan.

We complied information from Ready.gov for emergencies faced by those in the Midwest. For a full list of preparedness plans for all type of emergencies, please visit the Ready.gov website.

Floods

Here are a few tips you may want to include in your disaster plan concerning flooding:

  • Know where to go. You may need to reach higher ground quickly and on foot.
  • Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit. Include a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies.
  • Disconnect electrical appliances and do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water. You could be electrocuted.

Please see additional information for what to do before, during, and after a flood.

Heat

Here are a few tips you may want to include in your disaster plan concerning the heat.

Heat exhaustion

Heat exhaustion symptoms include heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headaches, nausea, fainting. If not treated, the victim’s condition will worsen.

  • Cool the victim by placing them in a cool shower or bath, or by applying cool, wet cloths.
  • Give sips of water or cool sports drinks containing salt and sugar. Do not give liquids with caffeine or alcohol. Discontinue liquids if victim is nauseated.
  • Seek immediate medical attention if there is no improvement, the victim is unable to take fluids, vomiting occurs, or any symptoms are severe.

Heat Stroke

Heat stroke symptoms include extremely high body temperature above 103°F, hot dry red skin, rapid strong pulse, headache, dizziness, nausea, confusion, unconsciousness. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly.

  • Call 911 or emergency medical services, or get the victim to a hospital immediately. Delay can be fatal.
  • Until the emergency medical personnel arrive on scene or during transport to the hospital, move the person to a cooler location, cool by removing clothing, bath, sponging, applying a cold we sheet.
  • Do not give the victim fluids to drink.

Please see additional information for ways to prepare for extreme heat.

Drought

Here are a few tips you may want to include in your disaster plan concerning drought:

  • Avoid taking baths—take short showers—turn on water only to get wet and lather and then again to rinse off.
  • Hand wash dishes by filling two containers—one with soapy water and the other with rinse water containing a small amount of chlorine bleach.
  • Store drinking water in the refrigerator. Do not let the tap run while you are waiting for water to cool.
  • Avoid using running water to thaw meat or other frozen foods. Defrost food overnight in the refrigerator or use the defrost setting on your microwave oven.

Please see additional information on how to prepare for drought.

Fire

Here are a few tips you may want to include in your disaster plan concerning fire:

  • Find two ways to get out of each room in the event the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke.
  • Teach children not to hide from firefighters.
  • Make digital copies of valuable documents and records like birth certificates.
  • Consider installing an automatic fire sprinkler system in your residence.

Please see additional information for what to do in a fire.

Tornado

Here are a few tips you may want to include in your disaster plan concerning tornadoes:

  • Go to a pre-designated area such as a safe room built to FEMA criteria, or a small interior windowless room on the lowest level, below ground in a basement, or storm cellar, is best. (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls.
  • Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.
  • Get under a sturdy table and cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body as best you can e.g., with a heavy coat or blankets, pillows.
  • Do not open windows.

Please see additional information for what to do in a tornado.

Hurricanes

Hurricanes don’t typically impact those in the Kansas City area. However, if you travel to places where hurricanes are prevalent, the information provided by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is invaluable.

Emergency Communication Plan

Plan multiple ways to communicate with family members by making a family emergency communication plan.

There is also a FEMA app for downloading to your phone that you may want to check out.

Atronic Alarms, Inc.